Challenge One Description


  1. The challenge area will be a 5 foot by 6 foot area enclosed by a 6 foot by 6 foot wall, characterised by a 5 by 6 grid of 1 foot by 1 foot squares of varying colour.
  2. Robots must navigate up one of the five columns (starting on a neutral tile) while reading a binary number from the grid beneath themselves, with digits being represented by white for 0 and grey for 1.
  3. Once the robot reaches the end of column, it will need to turn. If the number read is divisible by either 3 or 4, the robot will turn left and travel down the next column to its left; otherwise, the robot will turn right and travel down the next column to its right.
  4. Robots must only travel each single column one time. If the next column it has been instructed to travel down has been traversed already, the robot must successfully continue traveling left/right until it reaches a column it has not yet traveled down.
  5. Once the robot has traveled down all five columns, it must come to a complete stop in a neutral area.
  6. The robot will always start in the centre column facing in a predetermined direction.
  7. Scores will be tallied based on the number of columns successfully traveled in the correct direction and correct order. Ties will be decided by time taken.

Sample competition grid.


The grid squares in the challenge area will be one of three colours: white, grey, and black. In the play area there will be three parts. See diagram.

  1. Run-off: 6 inch wide run-off on either side of the main area.
  2. Neutral area: A row where squares will alternate in colour so as to make counting columns straightforward. There is one at both the top and bottom of a column, framing the active area. Note that the order in which colours alternate is not fixed, nor is any given neutral area guaranteed to use all three colours. The neutral area may not appear as it does in the diagram.
  3. Active area: Four squares framed by the neutral area which represent a 4-bit binary number. Digits in this number will be represented by white for 0 and grey for 1. The number is to be read first digit first; that is, the first digit read from the play area is the first digit in the binary number.

So, from the example diagram, if we read from bottom to top: Column 1 is 1001, Column 2 is 1110, Column 3 is 0101, Column 4 is 1110, and Column 5 is 1011.


Challenge details are subject to minor change as ambiguities are eliminated and any concerns raised.

Challenge Two Description


  1. The challenge area will be a 5 foot by 6 foot area enclosed by a 6 foot by 6 foot wall, characterised by a 5 by 6 grid of 1 foot by 1 foot squares of varying colour.
  2. Robots must navigate up one of the five columns (starting on a neutral tile) while reading a binary number from the grid beneath themselves, with digits being represented by white for 0 and grey for 1.
  3. Robot are to navigate the play area and determine which binary number is the largest and then park in the column containing that number.
  4. Numbers are to be determined by reading from bottom to top, a in the example given in the challenge area description.
  5. Bottom of the play area should be considered the side of the area the robot starts in.
  6. If a number is present more than once, priority is given to the left-most of the group. Left and right should be relative to which side is the bottom.
  7. In this case, the numbers ARE NOT guaranteed to form a path through all five columns if you use your path finding from challenge one.
  8. To park, the robot must come to a complete stop and sound a beep for one second.
  9. The column the robot is on once parked will be the column the light sensor is on
  10. The program you with the judge to run MUST be in the first slot. The judge will not run any other program for any reason.

Sample competition grid.


The grid squares in the challenge area will be one of three colours: white, grey, and black. In the play area there will be three parts. See diagram.

  1. Run-off: 6 inch wide run-off on either side of the main area.
  2. Neutral area: A row where squares will alternate in colour so as to make counting columns straightforward. There is one at both the top and bottom of a column, framing the active area. Note that the order in which colours alternate is not fixed, nor is any given neutral area guaranteed to use all three colours. The neutral area may not appear as it does in the diagram.
  3. Active area: Four squares framed by the neutral area which represent a 4-bit binary number. Digits in this number will be represented by white for 0 and grey for 1. The number is to be read first digit first; that is, the first digit read from the play area is the first digit in the binary number.

So, from the example diagram, if we read from bottom to top: Column 1 is 1001, Column 2 is 1110, Column 3 is 0101, Column 4 is 1110, and Column 5 is 1011.


Challenge details are subject to minor change as ambiguities are eliminated and any concerns raised.

Rules


  1. Teams may only use parts from their kits.
  2. Teams must use a standard LEGO Mindstorm EV3 kit.
  3. Teams can only use one touch, one ultrasonic, and one light/colour sensor.
  4. Teams MUST have their Bluetooth turned off on their brick.
  5. Robots must not be larger than 1 foot x 1 foot x 1 foot.
  6. Teams will designate one person to end their run, and only that person may call the run.